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Wood and Wax Exhibit

Thank you to everyone who came out for the Wood & Wax opening reception on October 6th. It was hugely successful and we are grateful for your support of our artists and the gallery.

Featured artists in Wood & Wax are John Andrew (burl bowls and bowls turned of Helena trees) Tim J Carney (contemporary fine furniture) Joyce Watts Coolidge (encaustic sculptures) Dan McArdle (carved wood relief sculptures) and Darla Myers (encaustic paintings)

Wood & Wax runs from October 6 through November 14. If you didn’t make it to the opening, there is still time to see this fabulous exhibit as we have curated it. Stop by anytime during gallery hours Tuesday through Friday 10 to 6 and Saturdays 10 to 5pm. Our opening receptions are always fun, festive and lively — and usually very educational. When the gallery is quiet on other days, visitors often have deeper experiences to the art — for sure it’s easier to step back and see the larger pieces when you are alone or with a much smaller group. Hope to see you downtown at the gallery in the next few weeks.

 

Panel-style Gallery Talk at Wood & Wax opening reception. John Andrew, Darla Myers and Tim J. Carney. All photos ©Eric Seidle Photography.

Thank you to Eric Seidle Photography for taking such great photos at our events. Please visit his website.

Susan Mattson an art activist

Susan Mattson is perhaps the most considerate person I have met. She deeply considers the ways in which various pieces of the world, herself included, influence and impact each other. Through her sculptures, Susan works out unresolved issues; both interior and exterior. While sculpting and carving, she allows her mind wander freely, reminiscing and following the flow of memories, regrets, projections, relationships.

 

Originally from Bozeman, Montana, Susan has traveled the world, taking a solo bike tour across the country at the age of 25. Every experience she has had, every place she has been, is still very alive within her.  The past is carved into her psyche in a powerful way. She is a vessel of lessons.

Susan carries out her intentions through action. She remodeled a house in Butte to rescue it from demolition. She uses the pulp from her fresh juices to bake scones, because, even pulp can be useful. She works in mental health. Every decision Susan makes is preceded by the question, “what would happen if every person on the planet did this?”

She is a steady and humble activist; her art is a demonstration of her deeply held beliefs.  But, she also has a goofy side.  Let’s just say she’s spent a decent amount of time on testing the limits of the face-swapping app.

Driven by curiosity, Susan researches her subjects exhaustively which translates into unparalleled originality in her pieces. For example, her current piece, Nacho Scapegoat, led her on a quest to discover how goats have taken on the burdens of humans throughout history in many, many ways. Susan never just randomly selects a subject, they all have a story behind them, they are thickly layered with meaning.

Susan is pretty much the MacGyver of art galleries. She’ll improve mopping methods, solve temperature and lighting issues with nothing but a bed sheet and a clothespin and conquer mounting dilemmas in the craftiest of ways.

Something to keep in mind when experiencing Susan’s work: every face is made separately with tiny ceramic and dental tools, then pressed onto the body of the sculpture. This requires massive focus, determination, and patience; every sculpture takes many, many hours.

So, come.  Plant yourself in front of one of Susan’s sculptures. Let it speak to you. Let it lead you down new path, or remind you of another time. Open up, lean in, listen.

 

Andrea Crossguns

Here is what I know of Andrea Crossguns. She is all heart. She spends her days caring for children and managing an entire staff of teachers; she inspires them, guides them and reminds them of their gifts. She is nurtures chickens, a guinea-pig named “Cutie” and a faithful canine companion named “Joey”.

Andrea prefers to eat one fresh, heavily seasoned fried egg for breakfast with a hot cup of coffee, egg first, coffee later. She is easily moved to tears. She is a brave and brilliant musician, an intense and deliberate poet, an active member of her community. She needs to hike and deeply breathe mountain air often in order to feel most alive.

 

When Andreas paints, she lets her brush lead the way and surrenders her expectations of what will occur. The result is a collection of work that comes from the deep. Vivid colors that overlap and collide in unexpected ways. Pieces that continue to unfold the longer you view them. Each and every painting of Andrea’s includes a poem, hand-written, rolled and attached to the back of the piece, only to be opened and read by the owner.

Right now- there are 13 Andrea Crossguns paintings hanging in 1+1=1 Gallery. Stop in and feel their power. We’ll make you a cup of hot tea (or coffee) while you absorb.

 

Trudy Skari, minimalist at heart

Trudy Skari is one of those rare people you meet who naturally balances the complexities and simplicities of life. A minimalist at heart, she focuses attentively on only a few things at a time in order to truly appreciate all they have to offer.

Embracing her strong Estonian background, Trudy derives rich meaning and imagery from dreams and the landscape around her. Very early on, she learned to tend to her own needs, overcome obstacles, and use what she had at hand to thrive. It was a basic and simple upbringing. Creativity has always played a key role in how Trudy positions herself in the world.

Trudy owned her first book at the age of 5, The Lonely Doll, by Dare Wright. It sparked her fascination with relationships between humans and animals and offered a new way to tell a story. The music of Allan Sherman really developed Trudy’s humor and wit which is still very alive and evident in her sculptures.

From the moment she visited her first clay studio, Trudy was captivated by the immediacy of translating an image in her mind to a physical form in front of her eyes. From there, she fashioned a former ice-house into her own studio/bunker on a farm where art was not valued, settled in behind 18 inch thick concrete walls to carve out time to create.

A champion of resourcefulness, Trudy is known to use clay scraps that most ceramicists would discard. When sculpting, you might find her sipping cold lemonade and listening to Tango music. Trudy doesn’t like to get too hung up on details.  The vision is there, it wants out, she just opens the door and allows her pieces to emerge in a natural way.

Come to the gallery and view Trudy’s incredible sculptures.  They are full of texture and pizazz; just begging to be held, touched, looked in the eye. One of them may even ask to come home with you, you just never know.

 

Gregg Edelen, artist of essence

For Gregg Edelen, pottery is medicine.

A retired sheriff’s deputy from Butte, Montana, Gregg has witnessed some pretty tough scenes. Gregg has used art to actively heal. He finds beauty and solace working with clay. He pursues joy; you can hear it in his chuckle and see it in his smile. From forming wet clay to tending a wood-fired kiln all night long, to driving from Butte to Helena to teach, deliver or create, Gregg takes truly embraces all his creative process has to offer.

 

Gregg fishes, but doesn’t so much care about catching fish. He cares about camaraderie, long-time friendships, laughter by a campfire, the sound of a fish slurping a topwater fly. He hunts but doesn’t care about the harvest. He cares about the absolute love he has for his hunting dogs, their dedication, loyalty and affection. He cares about breathing in the landscape and having the freedom to roam. Gregg is a lover of process, a person of essence. He chooses to create but really feels that, in many ways, the drive to create chose him.

 

 

Woven into Gregg’s platters, cups and vases, are elements of his passions. You’ll find subtle landscapes within the design, flies he has tied for fishing adventures, imprints of tails and fins, glaze patterns that resemble rainbow trout. Gregg surrenders his pieces, at times, to a wood-fired kiln, which requires 18-hour stretches of constant attention and re-loading of wood. It requires loyal dedication and trust between the elements and the artists. When finished, each vessel has been kissed by the heat and is one of a kind.

Gregg is a Montana native, a family man, a teacher, a photographer, a music lover, and insists that any tie-dyed t-shirt he wears be handmade. His favorite drink is a Virgin Mary, he drinks exactly one beer a month (with pizza) but never drinks coffee or eats potatoes. Ever. He loves sunsets over water, visiting forgotten towns and telling corny jokes to kids.

Come in to catch the broad scope of Gregg’s work featured in our current exhibit for just a few more days.

Tari Nelson-Zagar Violin Concert Sept 24

Sound Gallery Presents

Tari Nelson Zagar at 1+1=1

We’re excited to have Seattle violinist, Tari Nelson Zagar, back in her hometown at Sound Gallery this month. If you attended last year’s performance by Tari, you know it was a rare treat and we had a full house.

In this performance Nelson-Zagar brings another evening of sound exploration to the gallery, using found sound, improvisation, and discovering new music conversations hidden in old treasures. You might hear jazz standards, a virtuosic violin concerto, or an old cowboy song. You might want to bring all the bells you own, too!

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Wood & Wax Exhibit Opens October 6

We are thrilled about our upcoming exhibit, Wood & Wax, featuring a handful of talented artists who've dedicated their craft to working with two beautiful and challenging mediums in diverse ways.  They've shaped, molded, painted, carved, sanded and melted in means that promise to surprise and delight.

When: Opening Reception Oct 6. Show runs through Nov 14.

Where: 1+1=1 Gallery, 434 North Last Chance Gulch

What: Casual panel-style gallery talk by the artists from 5:30 to 6p. Wine/appetizer reception 6 to 8p.

Who: anyone interested in fine contemporary art, folks who want to learn more about woodworking and encaustic; adults and children. Everyone is welcome.

So ... Wood and Wax:

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Current Exhibit – From Earth

Tidepool Bowl by Trudy Skari
FROM EARTH: Clay & Pigment

 

Our next exhibit opens Friday, August 18th and of course, we invite you to join us for an opening night reception from 5 to 8pm. Three ceramic artists join one of our favorite painters with all new works in clay and acrylic paint. All four of these artists have been with us since our first year and we are proud to exhibit their newest work!

With diverse mediums, techniques and styles, the exhibit is curated to connect us with the source of our creative vision – our Earth.

Featured artists are Andrea Cross Guns, Gregg Edelen, Trudy Skari and Susan Mattson. Please join us during the reception to meet the artists and hear brief gallery talks between 5:30 and 6pm. Wine and appetizers will be served after the talks.

Come at 5pm if you have your eye on something and want first dibs! (We will update the website with photos of some of the artworks as we receive them. Contact us if you see something you want.)

Andrea Cross Guns has been working hard in her studio painting into the wee hours. Her background as a teacher, poet, musician and composer play beautifully into the evolution of her newest paintings. I cannot wait to hang this show because it’s been awhile since we’d had new paintings by Andrea. Our walls will be vibrating with expressive color — I’m so excited!

Gregg Edelen will have all-new atmospheric kiln pottery, including some fabulous naked-raku vessels in the exhibit. We have  gorgeous new serving platters, yunomi cups, tea bowls, tumblers, whiskey shots and mugs by Gregg. Tim Carney will have a few traditional Japanese tomobaku boxes available for Gregg’s yunomi’s and tea bowls. You have to see how the cups look in a tomobaku — they make wonderful gifts!

Susan Mattson’s latest work is a further development of her sought-after vessels with torsos or animal heads on top. As she makes the vessels, she forms hundreds of faces on the outside, each feature individually marked with clay tools, and each face the result of a meditative, transformative personal process. The energy she embues in her sculptures is palpable, remarkable and often unanticipated.

Trudy Skari continues to take her ceramic sculptures in new directions and has been branching out into both functional and non-functional sculptural pottery. Trudy has recently begun working with more texture, and will be showing some sculptural platters and bowls reminiscent of tide pools, the forest floor and sumptuous gardens. You will be surprised and delighted to see Trudy’s newest artwork, as well as some of your favorite, expressive Trudy-heads and small sculptures.

Elements of Earth used by the four artists are the common thread in this exhibit.
Clays used for ceramic sculpture or functional pottery come from the Earth, and are transformed by Fire — from something resembling skin, leather, powder and milk — to a durable substance like stone or hard dry river banks.
Clay fields are shaped by water and the sun, cracking over time into surfaces of mystery and fascination. Artists shape clay with hands and tools, with water, fire and pigments into objects of beauty, sensuality and function.
Painters move pigment around on their surface of choice with brushes, knives and fingers. Their pigments made from earth: diatoms, carbon, cadmium, copper, china clay, iron oxide and other minerals and these days, pigments synthesized from minerals like petroleum. Some pigments include clay: China clay, viridian, umber and sienna.
As you look around at the artwork in this exhibit, consider how each artist utilizes earth elements to express their unique voice and take on life.

Welcome our Newest Gallery Staff

Introducing Claire Bachofner

 

I was humbled by the many wonderful job applicants for our position at 1+1=1 Gallery.

I was truly humbled by the interest and enthusiasm of the fifteen individuals who were interested in continuing and enlarging upon the service our gallery provides for the community of Helena, Montana. We had two applicants from other cities in Montana, as well as many very qualified applicants from Helena, from all walks of life. It was difficult to narrow down the field, and we are grateful to everyone who applied. Thank you so much for your interest!

After a process I was new to (and with the help of one of our artists, Maureen Cole, who is a retired human resources director for the Forest Service) we chose someone we believe will take 1+1=1 to a new level with Tim and myself. She is an incredible human being: I already know that by spending time with her at the gallery, and hearing nothing but 1000% (not an extra zero there) positive remarks about her from everyone who knows her and has worked with her. I am super excited to have Claire on the gallery team. And I think all of our customers and represented artists will love her.

Claire and her partner, Phil, have two kiddos, ages two and four. She majored in Creative Writing at UM in Missoula and loves to write, practice yoga, spend time outdoors and model one of the best self-care-practices I’ve heard of. She is generous, eloquent, friendly, smart, knowledgeable about art and best of all, enthusiastic about the mission of our art gallery. 

Claire will be helping me stay in better touch with collectors, our roster of artists and potential artists, customers and media. She will be more in charge than I am, of social media (though I’m not going to give it up) and advertising; help plan events and exhibits, make press releases, update our website, write articles on our artists, gallery updates and newsletters and generally do much more communication than I have had time to do over the last almost 4 years. I’m sure I will be calling her our communications-angel very very soon.

What this means for me besides better communications with everyone who cares about our gallery? Omg — it means I will have more time to make my own art in my studio. And maybe more time to teach more workshops and art classes to kids and adults. I am so thankful for that. I can’t wait!

Claire will generally be at the gallery 4 days a week, so please stop by sometime soon and welcome her to the gallery and to the 400 block of Last Chance Gulch.

Watch for more timely updates on the website and more regular news updates via Mailchimp, if you have subscribed. If you haven’t subscribed, oh my gosh, why not? We respect your privacy and really truly don’t spam your inbox. Click here to subscribe to our once or twice monthly newsletters and announcements.

Claire Bachofner,  welcome! Thank you for taking a chance with us.

Downtown Helena First Friday Tabla Jazz Fusion and Indian appetizers

Join us Friday, August 4th for Downtown Helena’s First Friday celebration!

We have a fun family-friendly special event planned for the evening.

Veggie Pakoras and ice cold chai by Ishinder Kaur …  Live performance of Tabla-Jazz Fusion by Jaskrit and Haransh Singh from 5:30 to 7:45 or so.

Hope you can make it to the 400 Block anytime between 5 and 8pm. Homemade traditional Indian appetizers will be served until the food and drink are gone. We’ll have other cool beverages for those who don’t want chai. 😉

While you’re enjoying the music and refreshments, take in our current exhibit, the First Annual Art Jewelry and Figurative Art Invitational, and check out what we’ve put up in the Back Gallery. As always, we offer the best (!) gift wrapping in town — it’s free and given with love.

 

We know there are many events happening this weekend, and Friday in particular. Consider spending a little time supporting your very special downtown before or after you attend another event!

Come listen to Jaskrit and Haransh Singh’s fabulous fusion of Indian tabla and jazz music, then head over to the Herb & Garden, Funky Trunk, Aizada Imports and JMac’s Pottery. AND — Don’t miss the 3rd anniversary party of Mountain Sage Gallery right across the street from 1+1=1. They’re planning a fun birthday-bash.

Everything is free! We hope to see you at the gallery. Call 431-9931 for more info.