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Bonnie Lambert

Bonnie Lambert grew up on the South Side of Billings, never took an art class after junior high school (until college), but was an avid reader. She earned a degree in English literature and developed an obsession with photography.

She took the Greyhound Bus from Billings to the Center of the Eye in Aspen, Colorado- a leading edge photo workshop/gallery- to learn the technical side of photography, and more importantly, the art of photography

Artist Statement

I’m a storyteller: I give you a story, you make it yours.

I photograph clouds, water, buildings, fences, flowers, trees, rocks, vegetables, books; print the photo; place, pin, paste, tape, tie, balance three-dimensional objects onto that photo, and rephotograph.

I save ribbon, paper, flowers, sticks, rope, tape, lace, sprouted grape hyacinth; I use chalk, wire, gold leaf, colored pencil, charcoal, fresh flowers: all tools for storytelling.

I construct photographic narratives, sometimes autobiographical, often stories I would like to “read.” I invite the viewer to make their own narrative.

About Bonnie Lambert

Bonnie Lambert grew up on the South Side of Billings, never took an art class after junior high school (until college), but was an avid reader. She earned a degree in English literature and developed an obsession with photography. She took the Greyhound Bus from Billings to the Center of the Eye in Aspen, Colorado- a leading edge photo workshop/gallery- to learn the technical side of photography, and more importantly, the art of photography. 

After 18 months in Aspen, Lambert moved to Rochester, NY, to attend the Visual Studies Workshop. She earned an MFA in photography from the University of Colorado, Boulder. During her last six months at CU, Bonnie discovered the world of constructed or staged photos, and realized that this visual “storytelling” was her photo path. After a hiatus of nearly 30 years, Lambert started constructing photos again in 2014. She has exhibited her work (most recently) at Turman Larison Contemporary, the Holter Museum of Art and 1+1=1 Gallery.