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Tina Garrick Albro 

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Most of my memories and stories, both real and embellished are centered here, and my artwork conveys them as they diffuse and percolate to the surface. 

Layered images, color and color relationships are of interest to me. Ideas surface in acrylic and encaustic paintings, monoprints, and collage, most often in a series exploring an idea.

Artist Bio:

Tina Garrick Albro is a south Seattle native, who grew up riding the city bus, attending parochial school and dreaming about art and design. She has worked in mortgage banking, US-European policy, and owned several businesses. Finally realizing making art is a real job, she has worked in monotype, collograph, encaustic and oil painting and elementary art education.

Artist Statement: 

I have lived my whole life in the Southend of Seattle Washington, which is a racially and economically diverse community of immigrants, Boeing workers, engineers and wealthy lakeside homeowners. As a little girl I rode the bus all the way downtown with my aunts, sometimes stopping at Rose Street at the beauty shop, sometimes in Hillman City or Columbia City at Cleo’s dress shop (now Starbucks), or the butcher shop (thankfully still in the same place). I have many photographs of my Grandfather boating and having picnics on Lake Washington and of him working in his real estate office in Columbia City in the 1920’s.

Most of my memories and stories, both real and embellished are centered here, and my artwork conveys them as they diffuse and percolate to the surface. Layered images, color and color relationships are of interest to me. Ideas surface in acrylic and encaustic paintings, monoprints, and collage, most often in a series exploring an idea.

Monotyping is an analog type of printmaking made by drawing or painting on a smooth, non-absorbent surface. The surface can vary from zinc or glass to acrylic glass. The image is then transferred by hand onto a sheet with a press. Monoprints can also be created by inking an entire surface and then, using brushes or rags, removing ink to create a subtractive image, creating lights from a field of opaque color. The inks used may be oil based or water based, and the paper or other material may be dry, or damp. Monotyping produces a unique print, which cannot be reproduced in a series like other printing processes. Stencils, watercolor, brushes, and other tools are often used to embellish a monotype print. Monotypes can be spontaneously executed or be meticulously planned and created through layering and composing multiple images